THERMO THERMO – Wilmax Porcelain

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Borosilicate Glassware and Its Numerous Advantages

 

 

  Ever asked yourself why glass bakeware can resist blazing oven temperatures of 450 degrees without shattering or breaking, while general glass can all of a sudden break into a million razor- sharp pieces with an unexpected change in temperature?

The appropriate response lies in the type of glass being used. While general glass is rigid, it is likewise very fragile and less tolerant to sudden temperature changes. Although there are other specific types that come with significantly enhanced properties (not all glass is the same, believe it or not). One particular type that stands out and is well-known for its excellent quality and safety is borosilicate glass. Hence, what makes borosilicate glassware so one of a kind?

Boric Oxide The borosilicate glass structure is made of Silica, Soda and Lime (SSL), and also contains no less than 5% boric Oxide. The regular glass is made of SSL only. This uncommon component (boric oxide) was first added to the customary glass mixture by German glassmaker ‘’Otto Schott’’ in the late nineteenth century. By doing this, he created what came to be known as borosilicate glass. This glass is remarkable for its high resilience to heat and outrageous résistance to extreme temperature changes.

From Test Tubes to Nuclear Waste Storage

Had it not been for this discovery and its amazing properties, we wouldn't be enjoying the high-end stage organize lighting instruments of today, ranging from spotlights and LED lights to stroboscopes. Our cookware would be breaking, and regular scientific equipment like beakers and test tubes would turn out to be extremely powerless to chemical explosion.

From Freezer to Oven and Back – Without a Single Crack Borosilicate glass has incredible warm qualities, as it doesn't enlarge like normal glass does. Due to its low coefficient of expansion, it has higher warm shock resistance. Also, it can deal with sudden temperature changes- for example from freezer to oven and back, and remain shatter proof. The borosilicate glassware can also withstand accident that would break the regular glassware.

Chemical Strength – Borosilicate glass is additionally known for its amazingly high compound resistance. It is impervious to chemical corrosion, making it impeccably appropriate for research facility tests. It handles even the most explosive chemicals. The extraordinary property of this glass enables it to stay in a destructive domain for several years and still be in place!

Heat resistance – Glass of this kind has a higher melt point, making it more heat resistance than normal glass. Because of its low warm expansion coefficient, it can stay both clear and strong even when exposed to very high temperatures. Borosilicate glass can withstand an incredible working temperature of 515 degrees Fahrenheit and doesn't dissolve until 550 degrees.

Conclusion 

Despite the fact that temperatures required for manufacturing borosilicate are essentially higher than those used for regular glass making, it is still cheap and moderately economical to produce. As already mentioned, thanks to its warm resistance, sturdiness and affordability, borosilicate has been the material of choice for an assortment of technical applications, going from scientific apparatus to unvarying kitchenware. 

So, when next you stroll into the kitchen, give careful consideration to your cookware. There must be at least cake skillet, casserole or measuring container that has been made of borosilicate; one that has been at your humble service for donkey years. At Wilmax, our THERMO glassware is made of Borosilicate. Borosilicate is the material of choice for many household due to its affordability—general glassware are very expensive. Wilmax distributes a variety of borosilicate glassware products for household use, including our THERMO glassware. Lastly, our THERMO product is resistant to heat, last long and eco-friendly.

                                                   Wilmax Store

 

 

References

(Related: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borosilicate_glass)

(Related: http://www.qorpak.com/WhatisBorosilicateGlass.aspx)

(Further reading: http://www.wisegeek.org/what-is-borosilicate-glass.htm)